Dance Beat: Let’s Hear It For the Girls — Maria, Jasmine, Alexandra

March 23, 2015

MARIA CARUSO SCARF ARABESQUE

MARIA. Maria Caruso closed one door — performing with her company, Bodiography, here in Pittsburgh at the Byham Theater — and opened another, a solo career that will take her far afield. But before we get to that, she choreographed (and will continue in the future) a duet, Light By Love, quite lovely, yet controlled for Misa Pascarella and Dan Savage, with Theo Teris at the piano (a nice touch) and then moving on to Follow the Light, a ballet set to Cold Play, which showed how she has developed her rock roots with a larger sense of phrasing. Her solo, My Journey, relied on her own rock solid performing style. The piece was obviously heartfelt, detailed and much of it quite literal as Maria went through her life, following her own ups and downs through a scrapbook of memories, especially significant for those of us who have been there from the start.

JASMINE FLOWJASMINE. Jasmine Hearn’s inviting face tops an always curious body. But it also harbors a probing intellect that comes up with such intriguing concepts. Her latest at PearlArts Studio was a “response” (her favorite word lately) to the Bill T. Jones/Keith Haring collaboration called Long Distance at New York’s The Kitchen in 1982. There Bill created a dance  using the sound of Keith’s brushstrokes as he painted on the wall behind them. Jasmine paired with Chicago artist Ayanah Moore on this occasion for what they titled FLOW. Judging from a brief clip on YouTube, the women were more connected, both with each other and involving the audience. Ayanah’s large brown paper swatch had microphones attached to the perimeter so that her brushstrokes resonated more fully. Jasmine, in the meantime, worked the room — she has a real sense of personal theater, tempered with a naturalness that is always engaging. Beginning in a kneeling position, her back to most of the audience, she undulated, rising and arching her back to expose her breasts. Her sexuality was a part of it all — covered, uncovered, bared and recovered. But it was only a part of the response, where the movement could curl up and pop open, mingle with the audience around her, engaged in shadowing and playful repartee with Ayanah and jiggle with ecstasy. There were a few snatches of whispered songs, too. Oh, and Ayanah gradually uncovered the message: BOTH WANTING BOTH LOVING, written twice in raw, mirrored images. ALSO: Check out Jasmine’s gritty/elegant stop/start, always fascinating video with Paul at jasmine+Paul, also available for subscription:

https://www.patreon.com/creation?hid=1739587&rf=364407&ty=1

ALEXANDRA. Lastly, Alexandra Bodnarchuk just sent notice that her cross-disciplinary dance project (also with video) has been accepted for the 2015 Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. It’s called Dance From the Inside Out, but hey, let Alexandra tell you about it in her message: click on  DFIO.

 

 


On Stage: The Attack Theatre Reunion

February 26, 2015
Attack founders Michele de la Reza and Peter Kope.

Attack founders Michele de la Reza and Peter Kope.

Attack Theater is in the midst of a 20th anniversary season and it’s time for a reunion. Read about it in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

But also read what their dancers have to say, always a mark of a top-notch company —

Dane Toney: This is my 7th season with Attack Theatre and it has been extremely rewarding and fulfilling. Attack Theatre is about collaboration and there is a tremendous amount of respect that flows between artist, performer, administration, audience and community. Each day is different and continues to present new challenges. Those challenges range from transforming an abandoned building into a performance space full of life and energy to creating and then implementing a lesson plan centered on movement about the solar system for a 3rd grade class. There is always something new to learn or discover and explore.

Ashley Williams:

1. Working with Attack Theatre is like drinking from a fire hydrant: the constant creative, physical and emotional challenges involved in keeping up with the rehearsing/performing/teaching/inventing is drenching, mostly in a very good way.

2. Everyday we come to work, the job is different.

3. As a dancer, I’d expect my body to matter to my job. As an Attack Theatre dancer, my mind also really, really matters to my job. That’s cool.

4. I like being asked (by children after an in-school performance): ‘How do you do all them tricks?’

5. I love performing to live music.

Kaitlin Dann: The  reason why I keep coming back to Attack Theatre is because the company truly is anything but stationary. Over the past few years, I have had the privilege to continue evolving as a teaching artist, performer, and collaborator. We build our shows from the ground up giving us accountability in all aspects, from the construction of a stage to the final bow. The cherry on top is simply the astounding way Attack Theatre makes sure to take care of its dancers and administrative staff with salaried contracts and health benefits. I’d be hard pressed for find a more fulfilling company to work for.

Peter and Michele at their signature table.

Peter and Michele at their signature table.

 


On Stage: Ron and Stevie and Pittsburgh

February 16, 2015

pdc ronald k. brown

Ronald K. Brown returned to Pittsburgh for what was his most cohesive performance yet, one that gave African traditions a contemporary accent. He also gave his program a Pittsburgh accent, inviting a group of local dancers to rehearse and participate, much to their and the audience’s delight. Read about it in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


On Stage: Pearlann Part III

November 18, 2014

 

Brent Lubbert and Bre Short Photo: Cassie K. Rusnak

Brent Lubbert and Bre Short Photo: Cassie K. Rusnak

How can you look back when you’re always looking forward? Maybe by linking the two in a fresh new way, which is exactly what Pearlann Porter did to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the The Pillow Project.

She led off the evening with improvisational performances, her current mode of dance transportation. Taylor Knight was in a zone of his own as resident DJ.

There was a detailed time line along the big wall, ladled with the presentational flair that Pearlann exudes, from her first review of Z-zzz to, well, The Tenth.

An overflow crowd turned out to see the impact of Pearlann’s decision to remain in Pittsburgh. It was readily apparent.

Anna Thompson Photo: Sam Sanlon

Anna Thompson Photo: Sam Sanlon

She chose five fragments to give us a hint of the past. There was a tasty trio to start.  Anna Thompson so fierce in 2084. Breanna Albright hugging the shadows in a solo from Til the Bitter Fucking End and that memorable table sequence from Striped, so sweaty raw with Alex Bright and Weylin Gomez.

We saw from just that trio how her dancers have evolved their bodies to flow like lava with veins of hyper-heated intensity.

Later came a duet from Concept Album, with Kaylin Horgan digging so deep, with Rebekah Kuczma hovering over her. (Has it been ten years since we first saw her in The Pillow Project…and she’s only 24?)

The fifth piece was a part of Paper Memories with Taylor recreating the role of the writer, something that came to define him, and Anna as his inspiration.

Taylor Knight. Photo: Cassie K. Rusnak

Taylor Knight. Photo: Cassie K. Rusnak

We saw these pieces in a new way, though. The dancers had taken Pearlann’s current jazz style and layered it over the fixed choreography, providing a connecting link between Year One and The Tenth Year…and The Future.

Thank you, Pearlann.


On Stage: Pearlann Part II

November 16, 2014

The Pillow project @ CP Paris 02/16/2013WHY PITTSBURGH? After the Attack Theatre show, Pearlann was talking with Evelyn Palleja-Vissicchio (of the gone, but much-lamented LABCO Dance) who said to her, “What is it you’re doing? What do you want to do?” No one had ever asked Pearlann that question before. She answered, “I think my goal is [that] I want to get in on a city where there isn’t a lot happening. I want to be, like, the first one in there. Somewhere that doesn’t have a scene, so that I can make my own scene. Where I can do something that is specific to the kind of work that I want. I don’t want to fit into something that’s already going on — I want to start something. Evelyn looked at her and remarked, “Hon, it’s here.” Pearlann had been feeling a little unsatisfied with Pittsburgh because “it wasn’t enough.” The connection was immediate. “I’ll just stay here.” Down the pike years later, she had the opportunity to move to Paris and work there. She felt like a couple of people would have followed her. The reasoning? “Why not?” She knew that she could have gained the same momentum there as she had in Pittsburgh because “the enthusiasm is pretty contagious.” But when faced with the decision, Pearlann concluded that “I loved Pittsburgh too much. Paris never felt as good as Pittsburgh did. It’s prettier, but Pittsburgh is where I made my home and Pittsburgh is where the jazz lived. Home is not something you find; it’s something you make. And…it’s here.”

THE BIRTH OF JAZZ (PORTER-STYLE). She doesn’t go to memory lane very often, but as Pearlann looked back at her work in preparation for the 10th anniversary event, she realized what she was trying to do the entire time. “I was trying to choreograph how I naturally moved without thinking about it, like how I just listen to the music. So I saw all these failed attempts at trying to capture that instinctual live musicality — the choreography — which was not working. I was not satisfied with how I was able to get that out and I never knew why. One moment in 2010, she found herself with a new group of dancers exuding “fresh, young, raw energy. They were excited about what I was doing — it was like a renewal. It was like a New Age. I felt it. And I had to try something different.” So they all went to her house where she taught them how to listen to music, hoping that would help. They began to move, all the while listening differently to the music. “It just clicked. Immediately, suddenly, it just happened. It was a different way of thinking about the dance.” Pearlann had improvised her whole life, but this was how she improvised. “It wasn’t that I was going to invent movement. It wasn’t that I was going to find things in my body. It wasn’t this exploration thing, this investigation thing that a lot of improvisation is. It wasn’t storytelling necessarily. It was thinking of yourself as a musician. Specifically, like, if you were in the band and if you were making music and you were changing the way I listened to the music depending on what you were doing. It just, all of a sudden, felt so right because it wasn’t body-based. It was ear-based — everyone was able to do it. Like anyone.” The ones who connected to it the most were “the ones who felt outcast and ostracized about the idea of dance, whether it was the girl in the back of the class that never was loved back by dance itself or never felt connected to the dance. Or that person in the audience who always wanted to dance, but ‘oh, no no no, I don’t dance. I can’t dance.’ Everyone was able to connect to it because everyone knows how to listen to music. If you take the emphasis off the body and you put it in your ear, then you don’t have to worry about what your body is doing. You just have to listen. Your body will just move as it does if you are given some ideas about motion. I feel that, by doing this, it builds off the idea that improvisation can be a tool, it can be free, but it’s not just putting dancers out there and saying ‘make up something’ or ‘just move as you move.’ It has unified us with this way of working together. We all have this common shared language which is a philosophy we’ve adapted to our lives as well as dance. It has this whole understanding and dictionary and lexicon that’s been associated with it now over the years. It keeps us connected — we can talk in this language. In the moment we’re totally free, but it’s directed. To a lot of people in Pittsburgh, improv can be a dirty word. Choreography has always been seen as more work, edited and whittled down to this fine sculpture. It seems that dancers put more effort into it, while improvisation has often been regarded as effort-less. You don’t have to think about it and plan it. You just make it up. That is not at all what we do. We take improvisation so seriously. We can talk for ages about how we did something, but we won’t be able to tell you what we did. But we’ll talk to you how we did it and we can tell you why we did it, but the what? We just turned it around — the what is just not as important. The movement that comes out is not as important as the intention and how we’re dividing it and how we’re coming about it and where our minds are and where our hearts are. People can take it seriously if you take it seriously. You can’t just make this up. You have to put just as much effort and time, not into the choreography of the steps, but into the philosophy of the work. (I hate to call it work, because it doesn’t feel like work.) You put a lot of time into it, even though, in the moment it feels like it’s happening for the first time.” Pearlann admitted that if the performers aren’t careful to adhere to that philosophy, the dance can lose its cohesiveness. And some people hear that she puts a show together in a week or a few days. “Yes, but we’ve been together every single night for a year understanding our movement. So when the time comes, we can talk about the idea and ‘poof!’ there we go. It’s just that there’s a lot behind that.”

WHAT’S NEXT? There will be more according to Pearlann. More of The Pillow Project, which is good news. But so much more, due to a plethora of ideas that she will change the name. But not that much. So to encompass all that she and her very important collaborators have to offer, it will heretofore be titled The Pillow Projects.

 

 


On Stage: Breaking Free

November 4, 2014

BrandedHeader-HindBenali-2014-AliceDufourFlorence-650x250-1405704687

 

I never forgot the image of Moroccan runner Nawal El Moutawakel, who won a gold medal in the 400 meter hurdles during the1984 Olympics in Los Angeles. I remember my admiration as she ran in a traditional track uniform — tank top and shorts — and knowing that she was breaking multiple barriers for Muslim women with her performance.

By the 2012 Olympics in London, every Muslim country was represented by at least one woman athlete, although Afghanistan sprinter Tahmina Kohstani elected to run in a hijab and long clothing.

There is still a long way to go on the international stage.

We got a fierce morsel of their struggle as Moroccan choreographer Hind Benali danced in the intimate confines of The Alloy space courtesy of the Kelly Strayhorn Theater,

The result was a fully-formed and informed woman, representing the best that her country and, moreover, what she, had to offer.

Her group was officially named Hind Benali/Fleur D’Orange; the piece, created especially for her American tour, titled Identity, would combine traditional and contemporary dance.

It’s not often that we see crossover companies like this. Most memorable, via the Pittsburgh Dance Council, was India’s Nrityagram in 2002, which was primarily rooted in Odissi dance, but bravely ventured into the modern idiom and, in 2013, New Zealand’s Black Grace with its seamless blending of old and new.

In a way, this was more dangerous.

Hind brought composer Mochine Imrharn and hip hop dancer/flutist Soufiane Karim with her. Together they had a soulful opening, immediately reminding one of a deep history and windswept sands. Mochine‘s score was particularly evocative, giving Hind a supple platform for her dance, filled, as it was, with so much, including melismatic singing and cave-like drips.

The petite dancer was crouched to begin her journey, She stood up, almost encased in a lavish traditional costume,her hands scooping up and thudding against her chest. She tucked the skirt into her waistband and began quivering.

It was locked into  her tradition. But her distress became more apparent as she took off the skirt and embraced it. Soufiane provided an interlude with some hip hop, a contrast to be sure and a trend, but not particularly connected. Later though, she would use him as a foil for her emotion.

When Hind emerged again, she was crawling, like an animal wild and free. Yet she never lost sight of ritualistic elements and eventually revealed a black leotard, allowing us to see a rather lovely modern technique. At times she seemed to be shedding layers of tradition. Other times she tried to embrace her conflicting role in life and her feelings often burst through with uncommon force.

Occasionally that made Identity seem conflicted. Yet, at its heart it was truly symbolic of women in the Muslim world, who are gradually and collectively building toward their own brand of freedom. I also applaud the men in Identity, so versatile that the production seemed larger than three artists, and so important for their support and interaction.

So it was personal. It was political. Best of all, it was art.


On Stage: A Robust Fall Opening for Texture

October 6, 2014

 

Texture Studio Session-155-Edit

Texture Contemporary Ballet usually downsizes for the fall/winter season. But it looks like more talented dancers are sticking around. Maybe that inspired the choreographers in this convincing program, especially Alan Obuzor and Kelsey Bartman, who took us in some intriguing new directions. Read about it in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.


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