Dance Beat: Wrapping up 2013 — Part Two

1391781_10151981930346460_911768040_nPBT  POINTE IN TIME. Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre had its annual ball at the Westin Hotel, perhaps its most beautiful ever. It pirouetted around Swan Lake, with many guests clad in elegant black and white amid Mt. Lebanon Floral’s towering table designs. While guests could dance to Gary Racan and the studio-e Band and around the meandering musicians, they came to see one of the most anticipated features — PBT dancers performing clips from the current season. There was a sneak preview of Julia Adam’s Ketubah, rather restrained in its traditionalist Jewish overtones, and not one, but two of fine pas de deux from Christine Schwaner and Nurlan Abougaliev (Black Swan) and White Swan Alexandra Kochis with Christopher Budzynski (good to see him making an appearance in the midst of his recovery from a back injury). Most popular were the Twyla Tharp numbers — Gabrielle Thurlow  and Alexandre Silva in the Sinatra-inspired All the Way and a Stomper segment from In the Upper Room. But the PBT school students raised the roof when 60-some dancers squeezed onto the dance floor, to the palpable delight of the audience.

MORE DELIGHT. Maree ReMalia and Jil Stifel split the Kelly Strayhorn’s Fresh Faces series at Dance Alloy. Both were preludes to full-length works on the horizon, but managed to captivate on their own. Jil produced Objects For Dance, joining with husband/sculptor Blaine Siegel and movement partner Maree. Blaine constructed a real gallery feel (the piece was subsequently performed at a gallery in Philadelphia), with substantial walls and featuring art installations, dominated by a waterfall of colored fabric. It became a playground, with the women penetrating a flexible audience, who were free to move and respond. The women daringly chose Mark Taylor for a quizzical trio, opening up a delectable box of memories from the former artistic director of the Alloy in that very studio. Maree then followed with the Ubiquitous Mass of Us, a contemporary Keystone Kops scramble of a piece that somehow managed to harness the almost overwhelming energy of the nine performers, that also included Jill and artistic collaboration from Blaine. Us also broke down the wall, strikingly so, between performers and audience. Can’t wait to see the full-blown premiere at the New Hazlett Theater in June.

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